Friday, September 26, 2014

5 truly useful tips for the beginner photographer.



When you begin something new you need some helpful hints. Today I’ll tell you what has helped me. I’ll be glad if you find these hints helpful, too.

1. You need to become a part of a photography community.
There are so many websites now where you could share your photos (http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/, http://www.viewbug.com/, https://www.flickr.com/ You’ll be surprised to receive so many supportive and kind comments. Even when you read only something like “nice/lovely/amazing short” you’ll be glad, won’t you? And you’ll be truly happy to receive thoughtful, heartwarming, encouraging comments. Be thankful for comments, even when you’ll receive some constructive criticism. When members of your photography community see your photos you receive your personal recommendations (how to improve composition or colors for example). And do not forget to write your own comments for others. 

2. Look at the works of other photographers for a flash of creative inspiration.
Ansel Adams, Annie Leibovitz,  Josef Koudelka,  Berenice Abbott,  Brassai, David LaChapelle, André Kertész, Sebastiao Salgado… it’s impossible to name all the Masters of Photography. Watch their classic works, you’ll be taught by great masters. And you could watch and enjoy the works of modern photographers, both famous and lesser-known. This will help you to find your own style.

3. Learn as much as possible on photography.
It can be very beneficial to read books, to listen lectures online or offline. I can recommend you the books which I read myself: Tom Ang’s “Digital Photographer’s Handbook”, Scott Kelby’s “Digital Photography Book” (5 parts), Bryan Peterson’s “Understanding Exposure: How to Shoot Great Photographs with a Film or a Digital Camera”, Bryan Peterson’s “People in Focus: How to Photograph Anyone, Anywhere”. Take your photos as often as you can. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes. 

4. Do not compare yourself to others.
I can suggest that you will not compare your photographs with the masterpieces of the great masters (or at least not in the beginning of your way to the world of photography). They are beyond comparison. Scarcely will you compare your photos with that of modern famous photographers. But it will be difficult for you to avoid comparison with the members of your photography community or your friends. This comparing can be discouraging and demoralizing. Never compare yourself in your beginning stages with someone else in the middle of their way.
You can compare yourself with your previous self when you started. You are the unique you, you tell your own story with the help of photography. Look at where your are today and aim to get better tomorrow.

5. Believe in yourself.
Rome was not built in a day; it takes some time to become a good photographer. You could not become a photographer at the day you’ve bought your camera. Learn, enjoy your shooting, find your own style. It’s an opportunity to create something new in your life that you haven’t had before. And sooner or later you will become a good photographer.