Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Quotes and Action Steps Series (#4).“Do what you feel in your heart to be right, for you'll be criticized anyway. You’ll be “damned if you do, and damned if you don’t.” Eleanor Roosevelt

(via Wikiquote)
Let us explore great quotes of the past and of the present to know how we can apply them to our life.
Note: Some sayings have been repeated a few times over the centuries, and from time to time we find that one quote is attributed to several different authors. 

“Do what you feel in your heart to be right, for you'll be criticized anyway. You’ll be “damned if you do, and damned if you don’t.” Eleanor Roosevelt
What does that mean?

As quoted in “How to Stop Worrying and Start Living” by Dale Carnegie, though Roosevelt has sometimes been credited with the originating the expression, “Damned if you do and damned if you don't” is set in quote marks, indicating she herself was quoting a common expression in saying this (read more here).
The truth is no one likes to be criticized.
But it’s useful to remember that there are two basic reasons why people criticize others. Some people are trying to help you to improve by offering constructive critique. Someone is giving you destructive critique because of ignorance, jealousy, perfectionism, prejudice, etc.
And if you can’t avoid criticism, do what you feel in your heart.


Where can I apply this in my life?

As regards photography there are two opinions about the critique of images.
 Some say they do not need any critique because photography is a very subjective thing, it’s impossible to have one photograph as a pattern for all others and everyone has his or her own preferences. 
Others think that it’s impossible to know whether your photos are good or no unless you ask someone experienced.

 The truth is somewhere between two opinions.
The critique can be useful if the technical aspects of your images are criticized by the right (experienced) person. You can use constructive comments for improvement. Surely the comment “this photo is bad” is not helpful.
It’s useless to ask “Do you like this photo?” You may ask “What do you feel when you look at this photo?” If the feeling is something other than you expect, then you know you need more practice.

When you receive critique (on your life or your photography), ask yourself   “Is this person trying to help me or attack me?”
 If the person is trying to attack you, don’t demonstrate how much he affected you, just ignore him and walk away.  
Be open to criticism if it’s constructive.


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Stay tuned!